RRJ:  You grew up knowing who Jesus was, but as a teen you say you saw Him in a different light.  What would you say brought you to this awareness?

 

Dr. Trumbull:  Although I knew about Jesus, I didn’t know him personally.  In high school, I attended a summer camp with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and heard the late Dallas Cowboys Football Coach Tom Landry speak about his relationship with Christ.  It was then that I realized my sinful nature and my need for a Savior. 

Published in Faith @ Work
Wednesday, 08 November 2017 09:06

Kim Kervin, Lawyer, Prattville AL

RRJ:  Kim, you grew up in Athens, Alabama in a Christian home.  How did your parents create an environment for you to know God’s love through Christ? 

 

Kim:  Growing up, my parents were both hard working. My father worked in a textile plant in Decatur, Alabama and my mother worked in the home.  We attended church on Sunday mornings, but were not really involved in other church activities. My parents also used our home and life routines to create an environment for us to connect to God and know his love through Christ. While I was raised in a Christian home, it was much later before I invited Jesus into my heart.

Published in Faith @ Work
Wednesday, 11 October 2017 16:28

Barbara Davis, Fine Artist

Meet local artist Barbara Davis as she shares her journey of choosing art as a career, uncertainties and blessings included.

Published in Faith @ Work

RRJ:  You mentioned that you were raised in a Christian home.  How instrumental do you think that foundation was in who you are today?

 

Ron:  Being raised in a Christian home was critical to everything I believe today.  It was the foundation for my life and lifestyle. I’m by no means perfect! I make mistakes like anyone else. I sin. I’m human. However, when I do make those mistakes, I know God is forgiving, and I ask for his forgiveness. Then I try to change and do better. I try to please God. I try to treat others the way I want to be treated. I learned that as a child. My mother and father were excellent examples of that as they displayed love for us in the home. We were raised in the church and learned the principles of Christian living…LOVE. The Bible doesn’t specifically address every situation we will be faced with in life, but the Christian principles I was taught still help me with those decisions.  

Published in Faith @ Work

RRJ:  Growing up in a Christian home, you’ve known about Jesus for a long time, but when did you come to truly know Jesus?  

 

Laura:  I think this is a lifelong goal. Knowing Jesus is both simple and complex at the same time. I started really trying to learn more about Jesus and my faith in my late 20s. Many things have changed my perspective about my relationship with Christ: becoming a parent and truly understanding unconditional love; reading and studying about the life of Christ; doing personal inventory about my beliefs versus what the truth of the Bible says...these and many other things have brought me to the understanding that I know all I need to know-- that the gospel is a very simple message, but also understanding there truly is so much more to learn.

Published in Faith @ Work

RRJ:  Growing up, you attended church with your grandparents and mom and were baptized at age 12.  Was this when you realized your need for Jesus’ offer of salvation? 

 

Brad:  No, my baptism felt very ceremonial, like it was a graduation event for taking the baptism class at church.  It wasn’t until Young Life camp at Windy Gap, North Carolina that I realized Jesus could truly change my life.  I realized that His path to eternal life was a better choice, my peer group was healthier, and just the experience of His grace was indescribable.

Published in Faith @ Work
Monday, 08 May 2017 13:09

Judah and Samantha Helms

RRJ:  You both had exposure to Jesus and His church as children, but you were still left wanting more.  What would you two say were the ingredients for your powerless (ho-hum) Christianity?

 

Judah: Growing up in the South, I identified with Christianity as a part of my culture. Going to church was expected of you, just like it was expected that you be an obedient child and make good grades. For me, falling in line with those cultural expectations was my lone incentive to be a Christian. I didn’t want to be an outcast or generate any controversy around myself. So I became the “good Christian boy” that my family could be proud of. But in the end, that is a very disingenuous lifestyle that isn’t sustainable. 

Published in Faith @ Work

RRJ:  Your faith became real during college as you got involved in campus ministries. What was different about that environment and how did your faith change?

 

Mia:  As a child, church was instilled in me by my grandmother. She was a pianist for two churches and would travel between the two on Sundays with myself and my siblings in tow. When I was eleven she died and I didn’t get back to church until I got my driver’s license.  I would drive myself and was baptized at the age of 17. 

Joining the Baptist Campus Ministries on the campus of Alabama A&M University taught me that faith is walked out daily not just a Sunday experience. Listening and sharing testimonies helped me to see God in all things. It was then that I began to ask God for direction and intentionally look for is gracious hand in my life. 

Published in Faith @ Work

RRJ:  You grew up around a family and church that celebrated and explained the Good News of Jesus, yet when you left home and headed to West Point, you drifted from following Christ.  What was the cause?

 

Travis:  I believe the parable of the sower told by Jesus in Mark 4:18-29 describes my situation at the time.  I chose the cares and pleasures of “The World”.  Starting in high school, I chose to follow what I considered the “in-crowd”.  I became increasingly concerned with being popular, especially with women.  I was influenced not only by popular culture, but also by the friends I chose to hang out with. 

Published in Faith @ Work
Monday, 30 January 2017 17:56

Mike Vinson, Owner of Adams Drugs

RRJ:  Growing up you said you were a church-going straight-laced kid, but not a Christian.  Can you explain the difference?

 

Mike:  Growing up, I went to Sunday School and church every Sunday with my family.  I was never involved in church activities, so I didn’t feel like it was a big part of my life.  I believed in God and Jesus, but never felt like I was filled with the true spirit of Christianity.  I was a pretty straight-laced kid because I had a father who made sure I behaved.  I was never part of the partying crowd in high school.  I really didn’t have time for it, because all my extra time was filled with sports and athletics. During those years, I had some good coaches that tried to steer me in the right direction. One of those was Lee High School Coach Jim Chafin, who I went to visit out in Texas last year.  He definitely was an influence for good in my life.

Published in Faith @ Work
«StartPrev123NextEnd»
Page 1 of 3
Go to Top