Tuesday, 06 October 2015 14:03

Found Out

Written by  Bob Crittendon
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It’s unnerving to think that personal data could end up in the wrong hands.  We have perhaps experienced credit card information that has been compromised, and are learning that skilled hackers can gather data and perhaps use it against others.

This brings us to the situation involving the cheating-facilitation site Ashley Madison.  First of all, you recognize that these data miners are stealing, so they can take no moral high ground.

There are names listed who represent a vast number of people who had a desire to channel their desires for a person other than their spouses – that’s wrong and concerning.

Columnist Matt Barber made some strong points at Barbwire.com.  After chiding the moral relativists that see hypocrisy, when applied exclusively to Christians, as the only sin that matters, he writes:

 

Here is a fact: Adultery is sin.

Here is another fact: “[Y]ou may be sure that your sin will find you out” (Numbers 32:23). And how.

Some 32 million paying customers of the vile adultery website Ashley Madison, which makes a fortune off the backs of families it helps to destroy, have just learned this truth the hard way… 

 

Barber pivots to discuss the redemption that is available for all through Jesus Christ, writing that, “...there is redemption available for the millions of our fellow sinners who, tragically, chose to avail themselves of this sick site’s sinful ‘service.’  While they have become fully exposed, utterly humiliated and, for many, even ruined by a most selfish and lustful ambition; total redemption is yet within reach.”

He adds, “’For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord’ (Romans 6:23).”

Kyle Idleman of Southeast Christian Church in Louisville wrote this for CBN.com in response to Ashley Madison’s announcement a while back that 25 percent of those using its site professed to be Christians:

 

There is a story in the Bible found in the Gospel of John where we read about a woman who was caught in the act of adultery. She is ripped from the bedroom and thrown at the feet of Jesus to receive her punishment. The crowd is full of hypocrites who are ready to stone her. They wait for Jesus to deliver the sentence. Instead Jesus says, “If any of you is without sin, he can cast the first stone.” Slowly the stones drop to ground and the accusers walk away. Then Jesus says something to this woman. We don’t know her name, but let’s call her Ashley Madison. Jesus says, ‘Ashley, neither do I condemn you. Go now and leave your life of sin.’

 

That’s what I would say to those who identify as Christians on Ashley Madison. But I wouldn’t just say it to 25 percent of the members; I would say it to 100 percent. We come to Jesus and he offers us forgiveness and invites us to live a new and different life.

There are some great lessons for us in the midst of these unfortunate circumstances.  For one thing, as Barber points out, your sin will be exposed.  Maybe not in this life.  Maybe so.  What is done in what we think is the dark may be illuminated.  Above all, God knows, and there will be consequences for our actions. The double life is a life of risk and rebellion - the Bible says the way of transgressors is hard (Proverbs 13:15, KJV).  The threats of exposed sin and the misery of embedded sin should produce repentance.

Where sin has abounded, God’s grace can be found in greater abundance.  As Paul points out, that doesn’t mean we dabble in sin so that we can get more grace.  We can know, however, when we come before God in genuine repentance, we can experience a great degree of His restoring love.

Richard Clark writes on the Leadership Journal website:

 

…This is a time for confrontation, grieving, and prayer.

We like to advertise our churches as places for broken people. But when sin and its consequences come to public fruition, it results in a mess we often are tempted to clean up at all costs. Unfortunately there is no quick fix for the disorder caused by sin. The gospel teaches something else: work through the disorder and chaos, and revel in grace.

 

Finally, we have to make sure that we take the steps to remain strong when we are tempted.  The Bible tells us that God makes a way of escape for us when we face temptation.  Proactive steps can be helpful, making sure that we are grounded in God’s Word and reliant on His Spirit’s power.  The enemy will seek to attack us at our greatest point of vulnerability, so we can make it our aim to recognize the attack and appropriate God’s resources.

 

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 06 October 2015 15:25
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